Design and Dungeness

Added on by Stella Chapman.

Summer is over but I'll still visit my favourite beach, Dungeness  – a vast expanse of shingle on the Kent coast. What it lacks in traditional seaside charm, it more than makes up for in character, and if you look closely, design.

The monolithic Dungeness nuclear power station sets the tone of the unique landscape, which the Guardian perfectly described as 'the wild west meets the post apocalyptic'. It's this otherworldly, unconventional atmosphere that keeps artists and creatives visiting, and if they are lucky, making their homes here.

Design and Dungeness - View towards Mini Moderns beach house

Mini Moderns beach house

The two designers behind one of our favourite interior brands, Mini Moderns chose Dungeness for their retreat from London life. The 468 acre Dungeness Estate is home to only a handful of residents so they were lucky to snap up one of the Victorian railway carriages that were converted into homes for local workers in the 1920s. They stripped it back to reveal original features, opened up the space and gave it a signature retro twist with mid century furniture and their fabric, prints and homeware collections on show. There are some great before and after pictures, an overview and comments from designers Mark and Keith on this Design Sponge blog.

The living room

The living room

The living room view / kitchen detail

The living room view / kitchen detail

Inspired by their visits to Dungeness, Mini Moderns created the The Hinterland Collection including wallpaper and fabric featuring the two lighthouses that the beach house sits between. The collection is featured in Issue 4 of the collectable Penny Newspapers, which is sold out but has been published online here.

Dungeness Wallpaper – Mini Moderns

Dungeness Wallpaper – Mini Moderns

Dungeness Fish Shack sign inspired Mini Moderns typographic fabric prints

Dungeness Fish Shack sign inspired Mini Moderns typographic fabric prints

Contemporary architecture

Yes, Dungeness is a bit ramshackle, littered with old fishing boats, bits and bobs from the Second World War and discarded bits of machinery. Even the contemporary architecture that has been added over the last decade does its best to fit into this patchwork. The Pobble House by Guy Hollaway Architects, The Shingle House by NORD for Living Architecture and Gelon Hanna House by Simon Conder Associates were designed to meet strict planning rules. But they are all the more creative for it – black rubber cladding and other materials designed not only to withstand a battering from the storms, but look better for it. The Pobble and Shingle houses are available as holiday rentals if getting 'back to basics' in style is your thing.

The Pobble House – Guy Hollaway Architects

The Pobble House – Guy Hollaway Architects

The Pobble House

The Pobble House

The Shingle House – NORD Architecture

The Shingle House – NORD Architecture

The Shingle House view

The Shingle House view

Prospect Cottage

You can't mention Dungeness without Prospect Cottage. The most famous resident, filmmaker Derek Jarman, spent his last years here in the former fisherman's cottage, where he created a stunning garden which is well maintained today. It feels both wild and sculpted and its development is lovingly described in his book 'Derek Jarman's Garden' – his last and an inspiring read 11 years on. Dungeness is classified as a National Nature Reserve, filled with unique wildlife and over 600 different types of plants. That said, it seems Jarman had his work cut out getting plants to grow in the barren shingle!

Prospect Cottage itself is also memorable – it's black walls filled with the lines from a poem and gorse yellow window frames. I'm not a gardener but would love to give my coastal garden some Dungeness style. 

Prospect Cottage

Prospect Cottage

The Sun Rising by John Donne 

The Sun Rising by John Donne 

Dungeness spirit

If Dungeness was a font, it would look like ‘RX12’ by artist Paddy Hamilton at Dungeness Open Studios, inspired by hand painted roadside signs. Romney Marsh Brewery commissioned a bottle label, pint glasses and pump badge design using this lino-cut alphabet, which is available to buy in a digital format or as artwork featuring a personalised message.

Dungeness font in production

Dungeness font in production

Romney Marsh Brewery packaging

Romney Marsh Brewery packaging

If you visit Dungeness, the first thing you notice is the magical light. Then you notice the details, the unusual textures, patterns and forms. This exhibition by Philip Hughes Art captures this spirit – the scale, colour and energy. It's currently on tour and will be back at their London Studios next month to view. 

Dungeness Exhibition by Philip Hughes Art

Dungeness Exhibition by Philip Hughes Art

So, although creativity is flourishing in Dungeness, it remains unspoilt, peaceful and unique, and there's always something new to explore.

For an entertaining local's guided tour see www.dungeness.org.uk/what-to-see

My son George exploring Dungeness

My son George exploring Dungeness